We challenge young people to recognize the impact of race and ethnicity on American culture while also working to see beyond it.

We’re constantly updating this page with resources and information on organizations that work on issues relating to race, ethnicity and culture and the important work they are doing. Contact us with any suggestions to add to this page.

Recommended Videos on Race, Ethnicity and Culture


Seconde Nimenya discovered through her migration to America from Burundi, that the similarities of people around the world bridges the things which separate us.

Race, Ethnicity and Culture Organizations in Colorado

The Anti-Defamation League, created in 1913, fights anti-Semitism and all forms of hate, and works extensively on issues surrounding race, bias, extremism and hate crimes.  ADL has a Denver office and provides many resources for teachers and young people, including lesson plans, cyberbullying resources and the No Place for Hate program.

Café Cultura promotes unity and healing through creative expression, especially for Latinx and Native American/American Indian youth.

The Colorado chapter of the National Association of Multicultural Educators promotes and supports multicultural education as a means of achieving full academic potential of every student in Colorado.

Spirit of the Sun works to empower economic development among Native American/American Indian people and tribes, with a goal of fighting poverty within Native communities.  The organization also has financial literacy training programs for indigenous youth and young adults.

The Spring Institute for Intercultural Learning provides intercultural training and consulting to help organizations build cultural competence, and also has an extensive interpreter network.

YCD Workshops on Race, Ethnicity and Culture

Below is a sampling of workshops YCD has offered at prior conferences and events around the issues of race, ethnicity and culture. Click on any workshop title to read more about the session, the presenter, and reviews from our participants.

Addressing Anti-Semitism in Schools and Communities

“The gas chambers at Auschwitz didn’t begin with bricks. They began with words.”

How do insensitive comments, jokes, stereotypes, myths, and vandalism lead to other anti-Semitic incidents and, even further, hate crimes? This interactive session will empower and equip students and other community members with the skills to effectively and constructively respond to anti-Semitic incidents and the stereotypes that are often at the root of such incidents.

The American Dream: How do You Fit In?

A group of students play a game to understand the challenges facing low-income families.

In this workshop we will explore privilege, and the many levels of privilege that we may have, by playing, “The American Dream” game. After playing the game, students will have a discussion around privilege, how you use it to help yourself and how can you use it to help others.

Deconstructing Identity

What are the components of your identity?  How does this compare to others, and what can we learn by understanding the different components of our identities?  Join this workshop to explore these questions and more in an interactive format.

Dispelling Stereotypes of Modern Native Americans

A group of students listening to a speaker.

This workshop will help young people meet modern Native American youth, to learn about the diversity within the Native community and dispel stereotypes about Native Americans.  We’ll have an open and frank discussion on how these stereotypes have been formed, but more importantly how we can end them.

Does Skin Color Really Matter?

A student listens to the speaker.

This interactive workshop features activities, video clips, and frank and open discussion about the impact skin color has on society. Participants will have an opportunity to examine their views/biases with respect to exclusive and inclusive behavior in dealing with diversity and skin color. It will also provide the basic tools required to discuss this issue and more in a diverse and society.

An Evening with the Newcomers

A panel of refugee students addresses the audience to share their experiences.

YCD was thrilled to welcome over 900 people to hear from author Helen Thorpe for a discussion of her new book, The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom.

Helen joined a class of refugee students at Denver South High School for a year to learn about their backgrounds, why they came to the United States and how they adjust to life in Colorado. We also heard from a panel of refugee students on their experiences before they came to Colorado, and how they adjusted to life here now.

Fight for Your Rights: Examples of Youth-Led Change

How do we create change to help our communities? How can young people come together to fight for their rights?  In this workshop, we’ll look at examples of youth-led change by AJUA (Asociación de Jovenes Unidos en Acción), a youth-led immigrant rights and social justice advocacy organization in the Roaring Fork Valley.

In 2012, youth from AJUA led the effort to overturn a school district policy that allowed driver’s license checkpoints on school grounds.  These checkpoints were created with collaboration from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in an effort to find and deport undocumented students. After months of campaigns, AJUA obtained victory and was able to change the policy for the whole school district. AJUA’s hard work and dedication led to the group receiving the Youth Activist Award from the Colorado American Civil Liberties Union. Since then, AJUA has campaigned for the Colorado Advancing Students for a Stronger Economy Tomorrow (ASSET) bill, personal immigration campaigns, DACA rallies and other projects.

A Holocaust Survivor Speaks

A Holocaust survivor speaks to a group of students.

A survivor of the Holocaust will share stories about living through a period of time where diversity and respect for others was at its lowest point in human history. Most importantly, participants will understand why we must never forget what happened in the Holocaust.

How to Interrupt Bias and Bullying

One student looks at another.

Have you ever heard someone say something prejudiced but weren’t sure how to respond? Or tried to intervene in bullying but aren’t sure you were effective? Or gotten angry at a family member who said biased things, but froze up when you tried to respond? This workshop will focus on identifying practical skills and strategies to help prepare you to interrupt name-calling and challenge biased and bullying behaviors.

Islam and Islamophobia

Reema Wahdan addresses a classroom.

Islamophobia is the discrimination and oppression of Muslims. This workshop will serve as an open forum for students and adults to ask questions freely as they learn some of the common myths and misconceptions surrounding the Islamic faith and Muslim people. This session will also help participants understand how xenophobia against any race, religion or ethnicity should not be tolerated.

It’s Not Okay to Misrepresent My Culture

A group of students sit in a circle.

Is it wrong to wear a Pocahontas costume for Halloween or wear blackface to mimic a well-known black performer at a school talent show? Is it appropriate for celebrities to wear bindis as a fashion statment? This workshop, led by members of Building Bridges, will engage participants in a series of activities in order to help them understand the cultural perspectives of others while sharing their own ideas and experiences.

Know Your Rights

All people in the United States enjoy the same constitutional protections, regardless of nationality, religion, immigration status, sexual identity, disability and gender.

The best way to protect your rights is to know your rights. In this workshop, the ACLU of Colorado will share information on how to handle a police interaction to keep students safe and help de-escalate a tense encounter while not giving away their rights.

Lest We Forget . . .

Cassandra Sewell telling stories to a group of students.

We will use storytelling to take a journey through American history from the perspective of the African American woman. The journey begins with slavery and travels into present day America. Racism, hatred, and stereotyping are some of the many topics touched upon in this presentation. We will end with a group discussion on how society has changed–for better or worse–to present day, and the power of one.

Living Latinx Today

A group of Latinx students sits on the stairs and smiles.

This workshop will explore what it means to be Latinx today.  Through an interactive, group discussion, we will explore what is unique to the Latinx experience and how it affects our relationships, both with our families and communities as well as with those outside the Latinx community.  Participants from all backgrounds are welcome to attend and join us in this discussion!

The Psychology of Hate and What You Can Do

Students listen to a speaker.

This interactive workshop will explore the complexity around the different kind of ISMS that are out there in society today (i.e. racism, sexism, homophobia.) We will also discuss strategies on what you can do to help reduce intolerance within your school and community.

Real African Music

African drummers

Come join Real African Music and involve yourself in true African root culture. We will show you how to play African drums, dance with African style, and sing authentic African songs. The spirit of Africa transpires through the participation of its people in their rich musical culture. Come join us!

Sharing Stories of Love, Struggle and Finding Ourselves

A student speaks.

We will use creative brainstorming activities and writing exercises in order to share our stories of love, struggle, and finding ourselves. Through peer support we can grow as writers while growing as a community. All writing levels are welcome and all genres are welcome.

The Struggle at Standing Rock

A group of students standing in a circle.

Water is life. Few people can disagree that we need water resources to live. So why is there such an uproar in North Dakota about Native American land and water rights? What is the protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline really about and why are there so many opinions about what is taking place in this protest? We will explore this topic and the many differing sides of this issue, to include how the First Nations have come to see their place in the scheme of things as the Protectors of the Land.

You Mean, There’s RACE in My Movie?

A student smiles while in a workshop.

Why is it so difficult to get people to see “eye to eye” on matters of race? Well, in this session, we get our diverse audience to share a common perspective — mainstream movies! Learn specifically how to identify the six primary character patterns occupied by minority characters in mainstream movies and how to use these patterns to leverage more substantive and meaningful dialogues about race at school, home or within the community. You will NEVER see movies the same way again!

There is No Racism Problem in America

For the last 23 years Joe has consistently received excellent ratings from those who attended this workshop.  Here are some reactions:  “Freaking awesome!”  “What an eye-opening experience”  “Turned my life around”  You will hear a brutally honest presentation about racism, stereotypes, bullying, leadership, political correctness, family, education, beliefs and more.  Recommended for those who truly celebrate diversity.

Understanding Culture through Communication

A teen male and female sit on the floor talking.

How do we bridge cultural divides and what communication strategies help us connect and relate to those who are different from us?  In this interactive workshop, participants will explore the link between culture and communication.

What is the Big Deal About Indian Mascots?

Various Native American objects are seen on a table.

Why is there still so much debate about using Indigenous people as sports mascots and logos? This workshop will examine a range of different American Indian mascots, symbols, and icons. We will discuss why the use of human beings to represent teams, communities, or brands is so controversial. After covering a brief history of the images used as mascots and logos there will be discussion about existing native mascots and logos. Commentary on native mascots and logos by American Indians and a discussion of recent legal cases will also be included.

Xpress Yourself! Hip Hop, Poetry, and Spoken Word

Ara Cruz

Step inside this workshop and learn how to express your thoughts and feelings through hip hop, poetry, and spoken word. Give voice to our stories of love, struggle, injustice, and celebration. With our words, we can represent our culture and traditions as we strengthen our minds and better our communities.