Learning about our past is one of the best ways to determine what we want from the future.  Below are workshops offered at the Cherry Creek Diversity Conference that relate to history, politics and law.  Click on any workshop title or image to learn more about that session.  When done browsing, you can return to the Workshops landing page.

A Day in the Life of an Undocumented Student

What is it like to be an undocumented student living today in a divided America? A panel of college students will share stories of their hopes, fears and dreams in an effort to help conference participants understand the dilemma many undocumented students face today. They will also provide suggestions and resources on what we can do to provide a safe space for undocumented immigrants so that they can feel protected and empowered to continue their education or chosen work paths.

A Holocaust Survivor Speaks

A survivor of the Holocaust will share stories about living through a period of time where diversity and respect for others was at its lowest point in human history. Most importantly, participants will understand why we must never forget what happened in the Holocaust.

Diversity of Perspectives

Diversity isn’t just about our upbringing, culture, and affluence — it’s also about our state of mind. Explore with Ryan Foo from the Black Actors Guild as you journey through improv games that are designed to push the very limits of your perspective and understanding. The workshop will help participants develop an understanding of perspective, relationship, and growth.

Hate Crimes? Youth Decide the Verdict

In this workshop lawyers will lead an interactive session on Colorado’s Hate Crimes Statute.  The lawyers will present a case involving criminal hate crimes. At the conclusion of the trial, small discussion groups of students will become “juries” to discuss the issues presented and, with the assistance of an adult facilitator, reach a verdict. The group will also discuss diversity in their community and the value of preventing the spread of racial slurs and hateful actions.

I Saw it on Twitter: Bias, Social Media, and Fake News

How can two people in the same school have completely different perceptions of an event that was on the news the night before? Why do people create and share information that turns out to be rumor or misinformation? Why are these rumors are so hard to stop? How can we become responsible consumers and producers of news and information in the digital age?  We will explore the impact of bias, social media, and fake news using parts of Facing History’s “Facing Ferguson” resources by examining traditional/social media coverage of the shooting, the protests that followed and other contemporary sources. We will see how stereotyping, bias, and individual experience influence how people interpret information and will provide participants with tools to tell a reliable source from a questionable or fake source.

Join the Fight for Human Rights

This interactive workshop, presented by the Center on Human Rights Education, will raise social justice awareness of international human rights violations.  Participants will be able to identify common human rights abuses in their own communities and the world at large.  Possible solutions will be discussed to ensure that all humans are able to fight for their rights.

Lest We Forget . . .

We will use storytelling to take a journey through American history from the perspective of the African American woman. The journey begins with slavery and travels into present day America. Racism, hatred, and stereotyping are some of the many topics touched upon in this presentation. We will end with a group discussion on how society has changed–for better or worse–to present day, and the power of one.

Our Minds, Their Messages: Understanding the Media’s Impact

Did you know the average American spends three years of their life watching television commercials? Then add in on-line ads, billboards, magazine ads and messages from family and friends…What impact does this have on us? This interactive workshop will engage participants in a number of activities to discover which people and which bodies are valued by the media.  Attendees will leave with tools they can use for educating others in their schools, families and communities.

The Struggle at Standing Rock

Water is life. Few people can disagree that we need water resources to live. So why is there such an uproar in North Dakota about Native American land and water rights? What is the protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline really about and why are there so many opinions about what is taking place in this protest? We will explore this topic and the many differing sides of this issue, to include how the First Nations have come to see their place in the scheme of things as the Protectors of the Land.

There is No Racism Problem in America

For the last 22 years Joe has consistently received excellent ratings from those who attended this workshop.  Here are some reactions:  “Freaking awesome!”  “What an eye-opening experience”  “Turned my life around”  You will hear a brutally honest presentation about racism, stereotypes, bullying, leadership, political correctness, family, education, beliefs and more.  Recommended for those who truly celebrate diversity.

What is the Big Deal About Indian Mascots?

Why is there still so much debate about using Indigenous people as sports mascots and logos? This workshop will examine a range of different American Indian mascots, symbols, and icons. We will discuss why the use of human beings to represent teams, communities, or brands is so controversial. After covering a brief history of the images used as mascots and logos there will be discussion about existing native mascots and logos. Commentary on native mascots and logos by American Indians and a discussion of recent legal cases will also be included.